Appendix 2: Documented Needlework Teachers and Schools in the District of Columbia

Compiled by Sheryl De Jong

Young girls learned their needlework skills either at home or in school. In the District of Columbia many teachers advertised to teach needlework along with reading, writing, and other subjects. Public schools were not available to all students until 1862, but numerous private schools operated before that date.

Up until 1847, the District of Columbia consisted of three communities: Alexandria, Georgetown, and Washington City.  A list of schools and teachers where needlework is known to have been in the curriculum has been compiled for each of the three communities. Although intended to be as complete as possible at the time of publication, additional sources will continue to reveal new names and details. The Alexandria list ends with the date of 1847, when Alexandria retroceded to the state of Virginia.

Three primary sources were used to compile the entries:

1) the samplers themselves;
2) newspaper advertisements of the period; and
3) the Craftsman Database at the research center of Old Salem/Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. If an entry ends with an M and a number, it is part of the MESDA database, which includes a full text transcription of the newspaper

Alexandria Schools and Teachers

Name Location Date(s) Comment
Alexandria Free School for Girls/Female Lancastrian School 218 N. Columbus. 1812-61 Lancastrian School; Rachel Judge first teacher; plain needlework, knitting, and mantua making assumed.
Armstrong, Alfred 1827 Needle Work taught.
Bell, Mrs. Fairfax St. 1795 From Charleston and Norfolk; in 1799 in Richmond, VA; Plain Work, Marking, Open Work and Embroidery. M2569
Bradshaw, Mr. Prince St., between Washington and St. Asaph Sts. 1830 Beadwork &c. will claim a proper share of attention.
Cameron, Mrs. Corner Duke and Fairfax. 1809 From Virginia; white teacher; taught a primary school for African American boys and girls; needlework assumed.
Cooke, Mrs./Embroidery School Prince and Washington Sts. 1801-03 Taught embroidery. M77026
Cottringer, Mrs. Oronoko and Washington Sts. 1817-21 From Philadelphia; in 1822 teaching in Washington City; needlework assumed.
Dunlap, Mrs. Maria Anne Opposite Mr. Plummer’s store at the head of King St. 1810 Taught Embroidery, Tambour, Marking, Working Maps, plain work, &c. &c. M16623
Edmonds, Sarah (Mrs. Edmund)/Edmonds School Prince St., three doors above the late Col. Hooe’s. 1810-23 Taught Embroidery in chenilles, gold, silver and silk. Maps wrought in do.[ditto] Print work in figures, or landscapes. Tambour and Needle work, plain and fanciful. Fringe, and Netting, in all its variety. M10296
Edmonds, Sarah Eliza 1810-15+ Taught Embroidery, Fancy Work; assoc. needlework: Julia Maria Hooff ca. 1815, attrib. needlework: Anne Campbell 1810-1815, Margaret Fleming 1810-1815, and Martha Bryan McKnight 1810-1815.
Farnsworth, Mrs. House adjoining Col. Hooe’s garden, in Water St. 1802 From Norfolk, VA; taught sewing in its different branches, Embroidery, &c. M11196
Ford, Mrs. Andrew At her husband’s school between Prince and Duke Sts. 1799 Taught various branches of needle work. M76998
Fulton, Mrs. Washington St. 1821-29 Taught plain and ornamental Needle Work of every description.
Hagarty, Mrs. 1828-29 From Georgetown; taught useful and ornamental Needle-work.
Hallowell, Margaret Farquhar (Mrs. Benjamin) 220 North Washington St. 1827-31+ School operated by Mr. Hallowell; taught plain sewing.
Hannah, Elizabeth House of Mr. Robert Bryce. 1784-85 Taught needle-work. M15044.
Hardester, Mary Washington St. 1805 From Baltimore; taught Needle-Work. M76997
Jacks, Ann 300 block of King St. 1806-07 Taught plain Sewing, Marking, Netting, Tamboring, Embroidery. M77015
Jamieson, Mrs. P. 1821 Taught needlework.
Janney, Mrs. Mary and Miss Same place as ENGLISH SCHOOL, lately kept by William Kenworthy. 1805 Operated school with L. Janney; mother and daughter will instruct in plain Sewing, Marking, and in all kinds of useful Needle-work. M77022, M77023
Johnston, Miss Mary & sister King St. opposite the Engine House. 1840 Taught usual branches of a plain and ornamental education.
Judge, Miss Margaret 1825-27 sewing and needlework assumed.
Judge, Rachel, later Mrs. Townsend Waugh 1812-15 Lancastarian; plain needlework, knitting, and mantua making assumed.
Larkin, Mrs. Fairfax St. opposite M. Libby’s store. 1819 Operated school with Mr. Larkin; taught needle work in its most useful and ornamental varieties. M77021
Lee, Mrs. Rented house, corner of Water and Duke Sts. 1797-98 Taught Fancy Work. M21052
Lunt, Betsey House corner of Fairfax and Queen Sts. 1798 Taught Plain Needlework, Fancy Work. M22294
Mark, Ann Smith (Mrs. Samuel) and daughters 1826-30 Taught Cotton and Lace Work.
Mason, Marian (Mrs. John) House of John Mason next door to the Indian Queen on King St. 1803 Taught Needle work. M23120
May, Ann Prince St. between Union and Water Sts. 1797 Taught different branches of needle-work. M76999
Morris, Sylvia Near Lancastrian school. 1826-46 African American; sewing assumed.
Moulton, Miss On Prince St., corner of Alfred St. 1818-19 Taught plain and ornamental Needle Work. M77020
Muir, Elizabeth Welman (Mrs. Rev. Dr. James) Royal St. ca. 1817-30 From Bermuda; taught with daughters; needlework assumed.
Muir, Mary Lang (Mrs. John) Royal St. 1818-21 From Scotland; taught tambouring, needlework; assoc. samplers: Ann Carson 1818, Mary Muir 1818, Marian Wood 1818, and Rebecca Suter 1819.
Muir, Misses Jane, Mary, and Elizabeth/Misses Muir Boarding and Day School for Young Ladies Corner of Prince and Washington Sts. 1830-40+ Polite and ornamental education, Needle Work.
Muir, Rev. Dr. James 1790 …a person shall be engaged capable to teaching the branches peculiar to the Female Education.
Nichols, Mrs. Celina [Selina] 1810-11 Taught different branches of useful and ornamental education.
O’Reily, Mrs. Robert 1804-05 From Baltimore: taught Embroidery in chenilles, gold, silver, silks, &c. comprising figures, historical and ornamental, landscapes, flowers, fruit, birds, &c. maps wrought in silks, chenilles; gold &c. print work in figures or landscapes, cloth work in fruit, birds, flowers, &c. tambor and dresden, cross stitch, tent stitch tapestry, &c. M27115
Painter, Rachel Alfred, near King St. 1815-30 From Pennsylvania; Quaker; former student at Westtown; turned school over in 1830 to Mary Anna Talbott; assoc. sampler: Mary Pleasants Stabler ca. 1820.
Porter, Mrs. Eliza 1828 – Washington St., 1832 – Duke & Washington Sts., 1834 – Alexandria Bank – corner of Fairfax and Cameron. 1827-34 Primary class taught Plain and Ornamental Sewing in all their varieties.
Porter, Mrs. Fitz John Prince and Washington Sts. 1812-30 Taught at Lancasterian school; later opened her own school; needlework assumed.
Rowen, Mrs. At the corner of Washington and Prince Sts. 1811 Taught various kinds of needle work, Embroidery. M77019
Simson, Mrs. Queen St. 1793 From New York, Charleston, Philadelphia and Baltimore; teaching all kind of needlework in silk and worsted, crowning, darning and plain work tambour and embroidery she designs the work and executes the drawing. M35682
Sketchley, Mrs. Spacious house next door to Mr. Weightman’s, Prince St., one door from the corner of Fairfax St. 1811 From New York; then in Belfield, VA in 1811-12; operated school with Mr. Sketchley; taught plain and ornamental Needle-work. M50167
Smith, Christian Next door to Mr. Joseph Janney’s on Fairfax St. 1786 From Charleston; needle work. M36071
St. Francis Xavier Academy/Academy for Young Ladies 109 N. Fairfax; Duke and Fairfax 1832-39 Catholic; Sisters of Charity; taught Embroidery, Plain and Fancy Needle-Work.
Tannent (Tennent) Mrs./Tambouring School Prince St., near Mr. Love’s. 1797-98 From Norfolk; taught embroidery, tambouring, open and needle work, flowering, sewing, marking. M39482
Tutten, Mrs. Corner of Pitt and Prince. 1809 From Virginia; white teacher; taught African American children; needlework assumed.
Washington Free School Housed in Alexandria Academy. 1786-1812 Twenty percent female quota, after 1812 girls went to the Lancasterian school; needlework assumed.
Waugh, Rachel Judge (Mrs. Townsend)/Female boarding School 1827-30 Operated school with Mr. Waugh; sewing assumed.
Wilbar (Wilber) Mary Ann One door below the house of Thomas Swann, Esq. 1811 Taught Plain & Ornamental Needle Work, Embroidery Netting, &c. &c. M43776
Wily, Mrs. King St., house lately occupied by Dr. Rose. 1798 In 1800 taught in Georgetown; needlework assumed.
Winter, Mrs. Next door to Mrs. Mills’. 1820 Operated school with Mr. Winter; taught young misses to become complete sempstresses.

Georgetown Schools and Teachers

Name Location Date(s) Comment
Academy of the Visitation, [so named in 1817 – previously known as New Academy for Young Ladies; Young Ladies’ Academy, Georgetown; aka Georgetown Visitation and now as Georgetown Visitation Preparatory School] At the Convent of the Visitation in Georgetown, D.C. 1799 – present time Taught Embroidery, plain and ornamental Needle-work; assoc. needlework: Eliza Jameson ca. 1800, Catharine Queen ca. 1800, Maria Teresa Lalor ca. 1800, and Catherine Ann Lavinia Clemens, 1857 – wool work; assoc. samplers: Mary [Ann] Carroll 1801, Emily M. Jackson 1808, Elenor Durkee 1810, Celestia Mary Combs 1816, Mary Rebecca J. Brooke 1817, Mary Rose Boarman 1818, Eleanor Waring 1819, Eleanora Neale 1823, and Mary Elizabeth Laurence 1829.
Barnard, Mrs. Near the Old Columbia Bank. 1838 School operated with Mr. Barnard; taught plain and fancy needlework.
Becraft, Maria Dumbarton St; later across the street from Convent of the Visitation. 1820-31 African American; needlework assumed.
Benevolent School/ Poor School/ St. Joseph’s School Located next to convent of the Visitation. <1817-1918 Free school; Catholic; Sisters of the Visitation; sewing assumed.
Billing, Mrs. Mary Dumbarton St. opposite the Methodist Church between Congress and High Sts. 1807-20 From England; first taught white and African American children; in 1810 only African American; in 1820 went to Washington City; sewing assumed.
Bootes, Miss/Miss Bootes’s Female Academy Congress St. east side 1834 Assoc. sampler: Mary Elizabeth Fearson ca. 1834.
Briscoe, Isabella Montgomery St., near Zion Wesley church. 1850-61 African American; sewing assumed.
Brown, Mrs. House formerly occupied by Captain John Mitchell, near the market. 1814 Taught Plain and Ornamental Needle Work. M4157
Brown, Mrs. K. [Katharine Wigglesworth] Bridge St., opposite the Farmers and Mechanics Bank. 1814 From Newburyport, MA where she taught embroidery from 1800-1813; needlework assumed.
Chevalier, Madame [Sister Luc] /New Academy for Young Ladies Fayette and 3rd St. 1798-1804 Catholic; from France; taught with Madame De La Marche and Madame LeBlond de la Rochefocault; sewing, embroidery. M6177
Cobb, Miss Mary W./Georgetown Lancasterian School Jefferson St. <1830 Plain needlework, knitting, and mantua making assumed.
De La Marche, Madame [Mother Marie de la Marche] /New Academy for Young Ladies Fayette and 3rd St. 1798-1804 Catholic; from France; taught with Madame Chevalier and Madame LeBlond de la Rochefocault; sewing, embroidery. M8891
Doyle, Misses 4th St., nearly opposite Mr. Ritchie’s store. 1816 Taught Embroidery and all kinds of Needle-work. M77205
Du Cherray, Madame/Young Ladies Academy House now occupied by Mrs. Smith and Mrs. Wiley; 1810 – Mrs. Beck’s house on Jefferson St. 1807-16 From Moscow; taught Embroidery, and all sorts of Needle-work, which form a part of a Young Lady’s education. M68752
English, Miss Lydia S./Female Seminary 3017 N Street, later a block away on 30th St. 1826-52 Taught needlework; attrib. samplers: Elizabeth Nicholls ca. 1828, Artridge Priscilla Jackson 1829, Mary Ann Scott 1831, Elizabeth Orme 1833, Mary M. Meem 1836, and Martha D. Abbot 1851.
Gaither, Mrs. 1809 – Brick house on High St.; 1813 – next door east of General Smith’s. 1809-13 Taught various kinds of Needle Work. M63785
Georgetown Lancasterian School/Georgetown School/Mr. Robert Ould, Principal Jefferson St. 1811-42 Plain needlework, knitting, and mantua making assumed.
Grant, Nancy 1828+ African American; Aunt of Maria Becraft; sewing assumed.
Greentree, Mrs./Young Ladies Academy March 1809 – house lately occupied by Major Beall; May 1809 – Washington St. lately occupied by Capt. Mackall; 1813 – Beall St. 1809-11 In 1811 moved to Washington City and moved back in 1813 to Georgetown; taught needle work in its various branches. M68762
Hagarty, Mrs. Contiguous to the Rev. Mr. Mcllvaine’s Church. 1824 Operated school with Mr. Hagarty; taught useful and ornamental NEEDLE-WORK.
Hart, Deborah, (Mrs. Levi) Over Mr. Jewell’s shop; opposite the Farmers’ and Mechanics’ Bank. 1827 Will teach a class of young ladies to make their own LACE.
Henning, Miss [Eliza] 1/2 West near the Eastern Branch. 1800 Needlework assumed.
Herbert, Jane 1819 Taught Marking, plain and ornamental Needle Work, Print Work. M64175
Hill, Margaret Near Miss English’s seminary. 1840-60 African American; sewing assumed.
Howard, Mrs./Ladies’ Seminary Bridge St., opposite the Farmer’s and Mechanic’s Bank; June 1815 moved to Washington City. 1815 Taught NEEDLE WORKS — VIZ. Plain, embossed and open Cotton-work, Netting and Tetting, Landscape, Flower, and Fancy Crewal works, Embroidery in Gold, Silver, Silk and Worsted, Tambour. M17293
Judge, Miss Margaret/Georgetown Lancasterian School Jefferson St. 1814-16 Taught useful needle-work and the manufacture of yarn shawls; in 1816 went to Woodlawn Boarding School (near Sandy Spring, MD) to teach.
Lalor, Miss Alice [Sister Teresa]/Young Ladies Academy, Georgetown – later Visitation Corner of Gay and 4th Sts. 1799-1836 Catholic; from Ireland and Philadelphia; taught with Mrs. Maria Sharpe and Mrs. Maria McDermott; Sewing, Embroidery, Tambourwork.
Lathrop, Mrs. John/Lyceum Congress St. 1815 Operated school with Mr. Lathrop; taught plain or ornamental needle work. M70791
LeBlond de la Rochefocault, Madame [Sister Celeste le Blond]/New Academy for Young Ladies Fayette and 3rd St. 1798-1804 Catholic; from France; taught with Madame Chevalier and Madame De La Marche; sewing, embroidery. M21017
McDermott, Mrs. Maria [Sister Mary Frances]/Young Ladies Academy, Georgetown – later Visitation Corner of Gay and 4th Sts. 1799-1820 Catholic; from Philadelphia; taught with Mrs. Maria Sharpe and Miss Alice Lalor; Sewing, Embroidery, Tambourwork.
Nourse, Miss Rosa M. Highlands, late residence of her father, Major C. J. Nourse. 1845 Taught useful and ornamental Needlework.
Peerce, Mr. William House next door to Mr. Samuel Turner’s on Cherry St. 1810 if required, needlework.
Pennell, Miss Alice Hart/Classical School for Young Ladies Over Mr. Jewell’s shop; opposite the Farmers’ and Mechanics’ Bank. 1827-28 Taught all kinds of plain and ornamental needle-work; assoc. sampler: Eliza M. Waring 1828.
Philips, Mrs. E. North side of Bridge St., nearly opposite to the Printing Office. 1800 From England; taught in Washington City in 1799; Sewing, both plain and ornamental, likewise the making of their own Dresses either in Mantua making, or in Millinery. M67289
Pope, Emmeline (Mrs. William) 1823 Taught needle work, as neatly as any that can be produced, plain and embroidery.
Searle, Miss/Female Literary Seminary Gay St. 1823-24 Needle work, if desired will receive its due share of attention.
Sharpe, Mrs. Maria [Sister Ignatia] /Young Ladies Academy, Georgetown – later Visitation Corner of Gay and 4th Sts. 1799-1804 Catholic; from Philadelphia; taught with Miss Alice Lalor and Mrs. Maria McDermott; Sewing, Embroidery, Tambourwork.
Shedden, Mrs. Thomas (Matilda Cecilia Dowdall)/Mrs. Shedden’s Seminary House lately occupied by Captain Mix, in Cox’s Row. 1823-40+ From New Jersey; taught Fancy Work.
Simpson, Mr. and Mrs. 1813-1814 Taught various kinds of embroidery including worked muslin [genealogy samplers].
Smith, Ann Fall St. 1805-06 From Baltimore; went to Staunton, VA, Lexington, VA, and Fredericksburg, VA; taught the ornamental branches.
Smith, Clement/Classical School for Young Ladies 1827 Will be assisted by a lady… who will give instruction in all kinds of useful and ornamental needlework.
Smith, Elizabeth Zion Wesley Church. 1860 African American; from Washington City; assisted Rev. Wm. H. Hunter; sewing assumed.
Smith, Mrs. 1800 – George -Town – in the vicinity of the City of Washington; 1802 – moved to the three story brick house nearly opposite to the bank; 1805 – moved from the house on Water St. to a large Brick house, near Francis Lowndes. 1800-08 Taught with Mrs. Wily (Wiley); Plain Work, Marking, Embroidery in Lambs Wool, Silks, and Chenille, with a variety of other kinds of Needle Work. M51289
Smith, Mrs. Isabella and daughters 1829 – former residence of Clement Smith, and more recently Mrs. Lee, 2d street; 1830 – moved to Washington City 1829-30 From New York; taught all the branches of useful and ornamental education.
Smith, Mrs. Middleton At her own house; hill above the Methodist church. 1810 Taught needle work. M63823
Waugh, Mrs. Townsend (Rachel Judge) House in Cox’s Row 1830-32 From Alexandria; operated school with Mr. Waugh; taught the ornamental branches.
Webber, Mrs. and Miss/Seminary for young ladies Corner of Bridge and Green Sts. 1819 School operated with Mr. Webber; taught Every branch of useful and ornamental needlework. M64020, 64021
White, Miss Next door to the Columbia bank. 1806 From England; taught plain work, Fancy Work if required.
Wilbar, Sarah In Mr. Beck’s house, Jefferson St. 1819 Taught plain and ornamental Needle-work, in all its varieties. M64023
Wily (Wiley), Mrs. 1800 – George -Town – in the vicinity of the City of Washington; 1802 – moved to the three story brick house nearly opposite to the bank; 1805 – moved from the house on Water St. to a large Brick house, near Francis Lowndes. 1800-08 Taught with Mrs. Smith; Plain Work, Marking, Embroidery in Lambs Wool, Silks, and Chenille, with a variety of other kinds of Needle Work. M51290
Wright, Misses 1818 – Bridge St., near the Indian Department; 1823 – corner house of Col. Cox’s Row, 1st St. 1818-24 From Boston; taught needlework in all its varieties. M64024

WASHINGTON CITY SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS

Name Location Date(s) Comment
Aca Nada Seminary for Young Ladies/Mrs. Molly Bowie, Principal Two miles from the Capitol. 1851 Every branch of polite learning, as also every refined accomplishment, will be taught.
Annin, Mrs. Capitol Hill. 1829 Taught Needle and Fancy Work.
Archer, Mrs. Large room, 7th St., in Mr. McDuell’s new house. 1820 Taught with Miss Shanks; plain Sewing, Marking, Needle Work. M66792
Bage, Mrs. Between Jacob Leonard’s and Elliott’s Printing Office, Pennsylvania Ave. 1821 Taught embroidery, card work, and various other fashionable fancy works.
Beams, Charlotte I St. N, between 4th and 5th West. 1850 African American; sewing assumed.
Bell, Mrs. On L, between 9th and 10th Sts. 1850-59 Taught Needle-work.
Billings, Mrs. Mary H St. near the Foundry church. 1820-23 From England and Georgetown; white teacher; taught African American children; sewing assumed.
Bonfils, Mrs. SW corner F and 12th Sts. 1825-27 From France, New York, Rhode Island; operated school with Mr. Bonfils; taught Ornamental branches.
Browns, Mrs. & Miss [daughter] Six Buildings, Pennsylvania Ave. 1829 Taught Lace Work, Fancy Work of different descriptions.
Capitol Hill Seminary/Maria E. Cox, Principal New Jersey Ave., south side of the Capitol. 1833-1834 The ornamental branches form a separate charge.
Central Female Free School, Margaret Wannall, Principal 1835-45 For orphans; taught needlework and sewing.
Chalmers, Miss One door from the corner of 12th and E Sts. 1829 Taught with Mrs.Gilder; Plain and Ornamental Needlework.
Colfax Industrial Mission 7th and O Sts. N.W. 1867 African American; classes held every Saturday for 200 girls; taught various kinds of work upon cloth.
Connor, Mrs. M. A. Corner of 10th and D St., near Pennsylvania Ave. 1829 Taught Lace and Ornamental Needle Work.
Cook, Eliza Anne 16th St. between K and L Sts. 1854-68 African American; also taught for three years in a free Catholic school supported by the St. Vincent de Paul Society; sewing assumed.
Cook, John F./Union Seminary 1834-55 African American; Miss Catharine Costin at one time in charge of female department; sewing assumed.
Cook, Mrs. T. On north side of F St. between 12th and 13th Sts. 1827 Taught Needlework.
Corbet, Mrs. G between 6th and 7th. 1822 Needlework assumed.
Costin, Louisa Parke father’s house on Capitol Hill, on A St. 1823-31 African American; sewing assumed.
Costin, Martha father’s house on Capitol Hill, on A St. 1832-39 African American; sister of Louisa Costin, took over after her death; sewing assumed.
Cottage Grammar School Room on G St., west of the War Office. 1820 Needle work taught, if desired.
Cottringer, Mrs. 13th St., between E and F Sts. 1822-25 Taught Plain and Ornamental Needle Work.
Cutts, Mrs. L. Henry Corner of D and 12th St. 1835 Taught plain sewing, including dress-making; A French lady will give instruction in all the delicate varieties of Needle and Fancy Work.
Davis, Mrs.& Miss [daughter] F St., near Col. Tayloe’s. 1820-24 From Massachusetts; taught Needle work, useful and ornamental; Embroidery, Rug and Print Work. M69576, 96577
De Lee Ree, Mr. J. 6th St., near the Unitarian Church. 1824 A Female Teacher of superior talents, attends the Female Department, for Plain, Ornamental, Rug, and other Needle Work.
Dodson, Ann House occupied by J. H. Dodson on Pennsylvania Ave., between 9th and 10th Sts. 1829 Taught Needle Work, Plain and Ornamental, $1 extra.
Dorman, Madame Pennsylvania Ave. between 8th and 9th Sts. 1835-41 Taught Embroidery, Tapestry of different kinds, Bead Work, Plain Sewing of any description, and Cotton Work.
Durang, Mrs. New Jersey Ave., house lately occupied by Mrs. Lee. 1810 Taught plain and fancy Needle Work. M76986
Dyson, Mrs. Corner of G and 9th Sts. 1840 Taught all the branches necessary to a polite and useful education.
Elvans, Miss Frances/Female Charity School On Capitol Hill. 1834-1848 From England; established by members of 1st Presbyterian Church; taught needlework, sewing, and knitting; Miss Elvans taught in the public school system after 1848.
Evans, Miss 1814 – Near to Col. Wharton’s, on 8th St. East, opposite the Marine Barrack; 1818 – next door to Judge Thruston’s, Capitol Hill. 1814-18 Taught Needle Work in its various branches. M65096
Evans, Miss S. In the house belonging to Daniel Carroll, fourth door north of Dr. Thomas Ewell’s and opposite the Capitol. 1813 Taught all kinds of Plain Sewing, Marking, Muslin-Work, Embroidery and Print-Work. M77025
Evans, Mrs. Mary Ann & Mrs. Mary Brush, her mother Near the General Post Office. 1821 Taught Plain Needle Work.
Fales, Mrs./Mrs. Fales Boarding School for Young Ladies On 13th St, between Pennsylvania Ave. and F St. 1820 From Philadelphia and Marietta, PA.; taught Tambouring on lace and muslin, Embroidery in silk, Rug Work, Cotton Work, Plain Sewing. M69580
Fill, Mr. J./City Academy and Ladies’ Seminary Central Masonic Hall. 1833-35 Plain and fancy Needlework was taught.
Fletcher, Mrs. I near 22nd St. 1854-58 From England; operated school with Mr. Fletcher; white teacher, taught African American children; sewing assumed.
Ford, [Rebecca] Mrs. [John G.] Residence of the late General Brown. 1828 From Baltimore; operated school with Mr. Ford; taught Ornamental Work.
Ford, Mrs. George New Jersey between K and L. 1818 From Virginia; white teacher; taught African American children; sewing assumed.
French, Mrs. Pennsylvania Ave., nearly opposite to Brown’s Hotel. 1824 From Baltimore; taught Plain and Ornamental Needle Work.
Gardiner, Mrs. 12th St. West, opposite to Mr. King’s Painting Rooms. 1832 Taught plain and ornamental Needlework.
Gardiner, Mrs. John 1803 – Pennsylvania Ave. N. near President’s Square; 1821 – on Pennsylvania Ave., near the old Theatre. 1803-07 1821 Operated school with Mr. Gardiner; taught Needle Work, tambouring, &c.; in 1821 resumed school and taught plain and ornamental Needle Work, Embroidery. M76167
Gilder, Mrs. One door from the corner of 12th and E Sts. 1829 Taught with Miss Chalmers; Plain and Ornamental Needlework.
Godfrey, Ann Mr. Stuart Williams’, near the President’s Square. 1800 Taught plain needlework, tambour, and marking. M67274
Good Hope School Bowen Rd. 1866+ African American; sewing school.
Goodrich, Mrs. and Miss [daughter] 5th St., between D and E. 1859 Taught Sewing.
Gordon, Mrs. Charlotte, Miss Rebecca T. Gordon 1846 – I near 11th St. West, 1852 – New York Ave. near 13th, 1858 – 8th between N and O, northern section of the city, 1861- outside city limits for slave children. 1846-65 African American; assisted by her daughter Rebecca T. Gordon; sewing assumed.
Gray, Miss 11th St. West, between G and H Sts. North. 1831-32 Operated school with Mr. Gray; taught Plain and Ornamental Needlework.
Gray, Mrs. G St. nearly opposite to Mr. G. Duval’s. 1809-11 Operated school with Mr. Gray; taught all kinds of Needle work. M76166; assoc. sampler: Mary Ann Borrows 1811.
Greentree, Mrs. New buildings of Mr. McLane on E St. near Rhodes’s hotel. 1811-13 From Georgetown; taught useful and ornamental Needful Work. M68762
Haley, Mrs. Maria Capitol Hill. 1810 White teacher; taught African American children; sewing assumed.
Hall, Mrs. Anne Maria [Mary Ann] 1810 – Capitol Hill, 1820 – A St. near the Capitol; later – E St. North between 11th and 12th. 1810-35 African American; sewing assumed.
Hampton, Fanny Northwest corner of K and 19th. 1833-42 African American; sewing assumed.
Hauel, Miss 1818 – 7th St. near Mr. M’Ewen’s North E St., Capitol Hill, 1819 – South B St., Capitol Hill next door to Mr. Thruston’s. 1818-19 From Paris; taught plain and ornamental needle work. M70595
Hawley, Miss E. Formerly occupied by Mrs. Howard, and recently by Mr. McLeod, 10th St. 1816-17 From the state of New York; taught Needlework. M67399
Hays, Mrs. Matilda (Alexander) 9th St. West, near New York Ave. 1841-57 African American; sewing assumed.
Heaney, Miss [Ann] 1831 – House late seminary of Madame Bonfils, F and 12th Sts; 1844 – I St. opposite President’s square; 1846 – house adjacent to the residence of Colonel Gardner; 1852 – until accommodations are obtained will give instruction in Mr. S. Carusi’s Music Academy. 1831-34 1844-52 From Boston; taught Needlework, plain or the varieties of taste.
Hebb, Mrs. Capitol Hill. 1830 Taught Needle Work.
Henderson, Mrs. 1828-33 Taught Needlework.
Herbert, Miss J. 1826 – 8th St., three doors north Mr. R. Jones’s store; 1827 – 6th St., near the Unitarian Church; 1829 – at her residence 8th St. north of Pennsylvania Ave. 1826-29 Taught Lace and Ornamental Needle Work, Plain Sewing.
Hogan, Miss S. F St., between 13th and 14th. 1852-55 Taught Needlework.
Hohne, Mrs. Ann Sophia B St., nearly opposite Mr. Edward Ingle’s. 1827 Taught Needle-work, plain and ornamental.
Hore, Mrs. Maurice 1828 – 14th, between Pennsylvania Ave. and F St.; 1830 – 12th near F St. 1828-30 Operated school with Mr. Hore; taught plain and ornamental needle work.
Howard, Mrs. 1815 – a few yards north of the new Methodist meeting house; 1816 – moved to 10th St., near the Rev. Mr. Matthew’s Church. 1817 – moved to Lexington, KY 1815-16 Taught Plain, embossed and open Cotton work, Netting and Tetting, fancy Crewel Works, Embroidery in Gold, Silver, Silk and Worsted, Tambour. M66584
Hyde, Mrs. 25th St., below I and K Sts. 1832 Taught with Miss Turner; Plain and Ornamental Needlework.
Jackson, Miss Capitol Hill. 1852 African American; sewing assumed.
Jones, Miss Arabella/St. Agnes’ Academy On “the island,” (A canal built in 1815 formed a barrier between most of Washington’s southwest quadrant and the rest of the city. This section was called “the island.”) 1851 Catholic; African American; sewing and needlework assumed.
Kesley, Mrs. On Pennsylvania Ave. 1835-36 Operated school with Mr. Kesley; taught plain and ornamental Needlework.
Lancasterian School/Mr. Henry Ould, Principal 1812+ Plain needlework, knitting, and mantua making assumed.
Lee, Mrs. 1805 – Pennsylvania Ave., 3 doors west of President’s Square; 1809 – house near the Capitol. 1805-09 Taught Needle and Fancy work. M76165
Lewis, Miss S. E. Near the west market, adjoining Mrs. S. Hutchinson’s 1832 Taught plain sewing, marking, lace work, and fancy bead.
Maguire, Misses Near the Seven Buildings. 1819-24 From Baltimore; school operated by their father Hugh Maguire; taught Plain and Ornamental Needle Work. M70793
McArann, Misses 18th St., between I and K Sts. 1848 Taught all the varieties of Plain and Ornamental Needlework.
McCormick, Miss Capitol Hill. 1827-28 From Virginia; taught Needle and Fancy work.
McCurdy, Mrs. D. [Dennis] Navy Yard Hill. 1819 Operated school with Mr. McCurdy; taught needle-work. M70796
McLeod, Mr. John G and 10th Sts. 1821 Excellent teachers in every department will be immediately employed . . . Plain and ornamental Needle Work taught.
McLeod’s, Mrs. C.C. 11th St., between F and G. 1841-51 Taught the useful and ornamental branches.
Metherall, Miss 8th St., near the General Post. 1827 Taught Lace.
Metropolitan Collegiate Institute/Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Havenner, principals Between 7th and 8th Sts. 1854-60 Ornamental Needlework taught.
Middleton, Miss Mary P. Corner of H and 11th Sts. 1850 Taught Needlework.
Middleton, Mr. Charles H. Corner of 22nd St. West and I North. 1849+ African American; assisted by his wife the former Margaret Thompson; sewing assumed.
Mills, Mrs. Eliza B. Her residence, E St., West of the General Post Office. 1832 From the South; taught Ornamental branches as desired.
Miner, Miss Myrtilla/Normal School for Colored Girls 1851-64 White teacher; taught classes in domestic skills for African American children.
Moulton, Miss Maryland Avenue, Capitol Hill. 1824 Taught Plain and Ornamental Needlework.
Mount, Mrs. Opposite the City Hall. 1829 Taught Needle Work.
Nesmith, Ann East side 7th E btw L and M St., Navy Yard 1822-27 Needlework assumed.
Nevitte, Charlotte L. North side of Louisiana Ave., between 8th and 7th Sts. 1839-41 Sewing assumed.
Nichols, Sarah New Jersey Ave. 1822 Needlework assumed.
Noel, Angela/St. Martin’s School/St. Augustine School L St. North and Vermont Ave. 1867 Catholic; African American; assisted by Miss Julia Smith; St. Martin’s later became St. Augustine School; Needlework and sewing assumed.
Noyes, Mrs. [Catherine] 1816 – South B St., three doors west of The Revd. M. McCormick’s; 1818 – Capitol Hill. 1816-18 Taught various branches of female education.
O’Brien, Miss 1835 – near St. Peter’s Church, Capitol Hill; 1836 – near corner of 7th St. and Louisiana Ave., opposite the bank of Washington; 1837 – nearly opposite the Masonic Hall. 1835-37 Taught plain and ornamental Needlework.
Orris, Mrs. Large room on 10th St., near Pennsylvania Ave., opposite the Threatre. 1818-19 Taught plain and fancy needle work. M70728
Peters, Mrs. H. A. E St. between 8th and 9th. 1847 Taught all the branches of Fancy Needlework, Worsted Flowers, Embroidery, &c.
Phillips, Mrs. Above M. Dalton’s, near Lear’s wharf. 1799 From England; moved to Georgetown in 1800; taught plain work, flowering and marking. M67290
Plant, Mrs. Martha W. 12th St., opposite King’s Painting establishment. 1838 Taught plain and fancy Needlework. M76986
Pratt, Miss E. & M. Corner of L St. South and 4th St. East. 1832 Taught Plain and Fancy Work.
Public schools of the city of Washington 1806 Assoc. sampler: Ella Hancock 1853.
Reagan, Miss House next to the one lately occupied by Mr. Elliott on the Capitol Hill. 1807 Taught Tambouring, embroidery, open work, queen’s work, marking, all kinds of plain sewing. M76164
Reagan, Mrs. 1806 – house F St. between Capt. James Hoban and Josiah W. King; 1807 – F St. near Mr. Semme’s tavern. 1806-07 From Baltimore; also taught in Hagerstown and Frederick, MD; taught Tambouring, embroidery, open work, queen’s work, marking, all kinds of plain sewing. M76996
Resolute Beneficial Society near the Eastern public school 1818 Taught other branches of education.
Rooker, Misses 1845 -12th St., near the corner of Maryland Ave., in the southern section of the city, known as “the Island;” 1852 – corner of 6th and F Sts; 1853 – E St., between 6th and 7th. 1845-53 From Baltimore; taught Plain and Ornamental Needlework.
Russ, Rebecca East side 7th E btw L and M St., Navy Yard 1822-27 Needlework assumed.
Sawkins, Misses Southwest corner of 12th and F Sts. 1834 Taught ornamental acquirements.
Sawkins, Mrs. & Miss Between 12th and 13th Sts., Pennsylvania Ave. 1823 From Baltimore; taught plain and fancy Needle Work.
Shanks, Miss Large room, 7th St., in Mr. McDuell’s new house. 1820 Taught with Mrs.Archer; plain Sewing, Marking, Needle Work. M66792
Sinnott, Miss Margaret 1808 – fronting North G St., near the Treasury Office; 1810 – 14th near F st.; 1821 – contiguous to the residence of the British Minister; 1822 – removed from the Seven Buildings to 11th St., nearly opposite Mr. J. McLeod’s new building; 1826 – Varnums’s Row, D St.; 1827 – F St., next house but one to 7th St., 1842 – moved from Capitol Hill to I St., between 14th St. and St. Matthew’s Church. 1808-16 1820-42 From Baltimore; taught different branches of plain and ornamental Needle Work. M76163
Smith, Elizabeth On “the island,” later Capitol hill. 1843-60 African American; sewing assumed; went to Georgetown in 1860.
Smith, Miss Julia/St. Martin’s School L St. North and Vermont Ave. 1867 Catholic; African American; assisted Angela Noel; sewing and needlework assumed.
Smith, Mrs. Isabella and daughters 1830 – K St. north and 13th St. West; 1831 – F St. near 13th. 1830-32 From New York; taught in Georgetown 1829 – 1830; taught all the branches of useful and ornamental education.
Squire, Miss Maria 1812 – 19th St. West, between F and G Sts.; 1819 – Pennsylvania Ave., opposite the Seven Buildings 1812-19 Taught plain and ornamental Needle Work, Card work of various descriptions. M57865
St. Matthew’s School The Octagon House; 1799 New York Ave., NW. 1860-65 Catholic; Sisters of Charity; sewing assumed.
St. Joseph’s School for Young Ladies E St. between 6th and 7th Sts. 1847-50 Catholic; Sisters of Charity; taught Cotton Embroidery, Plain and Ornamental Needlework; extra charge for Cheneille and Silk Embroidery; assoc. sampler: Caroline R. Masi 1847.
St. Paul’s Female Academy Capitol Hill. 1831-34 Catholic; Sisters of Charity; taught plain and fancy Needle work, Lace Work.
St. Rose’s Industrial School 2023 G St. 1868-1947 Catholic; Sewing, dressmaking taught.
St. Vincent de Paul Society 1858 – Corner of 14th and H Sts., 1860 – L St., between 12th and 13th. 1858-61 Catholic; African American; girls taught under Eliza Ann Cook; sewing assumed.
St. Vincent’s Orphan and Day School House of late Marshal Boyd, in F St. 1825-1968 Catholic; Sisters of Charity; taught plain and fancy needlework, tapestry; assoc. samplers: Catharine Vonderlehr 1837, Julia Winona Lacey 1848, Mary Ridgway, n.d.
Stone, Anna Maria (Mrs. Henry) North side F St. between 19th and 20th Sts. West. 1816-22 Operated school with Mr. Stone; taught Needlework both plain and ornamental. M38211
Tastet, Mrs. House lately occupied by Miss Hawley as a Seminary, near the Catholic Church. 1817 Taught Embroidery. M71774
Taylor, Miss Charlotte Ann/Female Academy and Boarding School 1813 – At the house of General Van Ness near Pennsylvania Ave.; 1818 – G St., a little to the westward of Dr. Elzy’s dwelling house. 1813-1818 From England; taught Plain Sewing, Marking & Muslin work, Fine and Plain Needle-Work. M57870
The Colored Orphans’ Home/School 8th St. 1863-71+ African American; Children taught sewing, knitting, and straw-braiding.
Thompson, Margaret 26th near Pennsylvania Ave. 1842-46 African American; sewing assumed; took over from Fanny Hampton; later married Charles H. Middleton and assisted in his school.
Thompson, Mrs. Louisiana Ave., nearly opposite the City Hall. 1829-36 Operated school with Mr. Thompson; taught Needlework.
Trinity Institute for Young Ladies/The Young Ladies Institute, Mrs. J. A. Davis, Principal 4 1/2 St., between C St. and Pennsylvania Ave. 1848-51 Needlework taught.
Turnbul, Mrs. Elizabeth Pennsylvania Ave., next door to Mrs. Byrne. 1819-22 Tambour-work taught by lessons if required. M70750
Turner, Miss 25th St., below I and K Sts. 1832 Taught with Mrs. Hyde; Plain and Ornamental Needlework.
Tyson, Mary A. & Sisters /Mary A. Tyson and Sisters’ Seminary For Young Ladies F St., north side, between 12th and 13th. 1840-55 From Baltimore; taught Worsted and Ornamental Needlework in all its various branches; assoc. sampler: Mary M. Bryant 1848.
Union Institute, Miss E. A King, Principal of Female department E St., between 9th and 10th Sts. 1849 Instruction is given in plain and ornamental needlework.
Vidler, Ann Greenleaf-Point; at 9th and K Sts. S.E. (Navy Yard Hill). 1797 Taught plain, open and Tambour Work. M64525
Walker, Miss Susan/Industrial School Campbell barracks, near the terminus of the 7th St. railroad. 1865 Taught various kinds of plain sewing.
Wall, Mary 15th St., NW 1824 Quaker; from Virginia; white teacher; taught African American children; sewing assumed.
Wall, Miss Sarah E. /New England Friends’ Mission Government buildings. 1865 From Massachusetts; white teacher; taught sewing to African American children.
Wallace, Mrs. 10th St., adjacent to Pennsylvania Ave. 1820 Taught plain needlework, fancy muslin work. M70753
Washington Female Orphan Asylum School Northwest corner of 10 St. NW, near Pennsylvania Ave. 1815-1824+ Sewing taught; Dolley Madison one of the original founders and volunteer seamstress.
Washington, Annie E 1857 – K between 17th and 18th Sts West; 1858 – L street; 1864 – corner of 19th and I Sts. 1857-67 African American; sewing assumed; later taught in the public schools.
Western Academy/Miss Young, Principal Corner of 17th St. 1831-32 Needlework taught.
Wheat, Mrs. On 11th St., between G and H Sts. 1832 Operated school with Mr. Wheat; taught Ornamental Needle Work.
White, Mrs. Richard 1806 Taught various useful and ornamental kinds of works.
Wolfenden, Mrs. B. Corner of 4th St. and Virginia Ave. 1823 From Baltimore; taught plain Sewing and Marking, Embroidery and other ornamental Needle work.
Wood, Miss/Washington Eastern Academy/J. Sterns, Principal 1822 From Newburyport, MA; taught Needle-work.
Wood, Miss 13th St., between E and F Sts. 1835 Taught Needle Work.
Wood, Mrs. Ellen B./St. Aloysius School for Girls 1863 – 15th; 1864 – E St. North; 1867 – Third St. West and G St. North. 1863-67+ Born in Hayti [Haiti]; from Philadelphia; for African American girls; sewing and needlework assumed.
Wormley, Mary Near corner of Vermont Ave. and I St. 1830-32 African American; sewing assumed.
Wright, Miss Mary F. House of Mrs. Glover, in 10th St. 1830 From Georgetown; taught Plain and Ornamental Needle Work.
Young, Miss Ann 18th St., first door from Pennsylvania Ave. 1845-49 A proportionate time will be allotted to the ornamental studies.